Sacraments

Sacraments of Initiation

Baptism

"Holy Baptism is the basis of the whole Christian life, the gateway to life in the Spirit (vitae spiritualis ianua), and the door which gives access to the other sacraments. Through Baptism we are freed from sin and reborn as sons of God; we become members of Christ, are incorporated into the Church and made sharers in her mission: "Baptism is the sacrament of regeneration through water in the word"  (CCC 1213). Download and Print the Baptism Application Form Here

Glossary - Baptism: The first of the seven sacraments, and the “door” which gives access to the other sacraments. Baptism is the first and chief sacrament of forgiveness of sins because it unites us with Christ, who died for our sins and rose for our justification.  Baptism, Confirmation, and Eucharist constitute the “sacraments of initiation” by which a believer receives the remission of original and personal sin, begins a new life in Christ and the Holy Spirit, and is incorporated into the Church, the Body of Christ.  The rite of Baptism consists in immersing the candidate in water, or pouring water on the head, while pronouncing the invocation of the Most Holy Trinity: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit (CCC 977, 1213 ff.; 1275, 1278).  Copyright © 2000, USCCB.

 

Confirmation

Confirmation is a Catholic sacrament of mature Christian commitment and a deepening of baptismal gifts. Like Baptism and Eucharist, it is a Sacrament of Initiation for Catholics and a Sacrament of faith in God's fidelity to us.

Glossary - Confirmation: One of the ensemble of the Sacraments of Initiation into the Church, together with Baptism and Eucharist. Confirmation completes the grace of Baptism by a special outpouring of the gifts of the Holy Spirit, which seal or “confirm” the baptized in union with Christ and equip them for active participation in the worship and apostolic life of the Church (CCC 1285).  Copyright © 2000, USCCB.

 

Eucharist

Catholics believe the Eucharist, or Communion, is both a sacrifice and a meal. We believe in the real presence of Jesus, who died for our sins. As we receive Christ's Body and Blood, we also are nourished spiritually and brought closer to God.

"At the Last Supper, on the night he was betrayed, our Savior instituted the Eucharistic sacrifice of his Body and Blood. This he did in order to perpetuate the sacrifice of the cross throughout the ages until he should come again, and so to entrust to his beloved Spouse, the Church, a memorial of his death and resurrection: a sacrament of love, a sign of unity, a bond of charity, a Paschal banquet 'in which Christ is consumed, the mind is filled with grace, and a pledge of future glory is given to us'" (CCC 1323).

Glossary - Eucharist: The ritual, sacramental action of thanksgiving to God which constitutes the principal Christian liturgical celebration of and communion in the paschal mystery of Christ. The liturgical action called the Eucharist is also traditionally known as the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. It is one of the seven sacraments of the Church; the Holy Eucharist completes Christian initiation (CCC 1322 ff.). The Sunday celebration of the Eucharist is at the heart of the Church’s life (CCC 2177). Copyright © 2000, USCCB.

Glossary - MASS: The Eucharist or principal sacramental celebration of the Church, established by Jesus at the Last Supper, in which the mystery of our salvation through participation in the sacrificial death and glorious Resurrection of Christ is renewed and accomplished. The Mass renews the paschal sacrifice of Christ as the sacrifice offered by the Church. It is called “Mass” (from the Latin missa) because of the “mission” or “sending” with which the liturgical celebration concludes (Latin: “Ite, Missa est.”) (CCC 1332; cf. 1088, 1382, 2192). Copyright © 2000, USCCB.

 

 

Sacraments of Healing

Reconciliation

The Catholic Sacrament of Reconciliation (also known as the Sacrament of Penance, or Penance and Reconciliation) has three elements: conversion, confession and celebration. In it we find God's unconditional forgiveness, and as a result we are called to forgive others.

Glossary - RECONCILIATION, SACRAMENT OF: The sacramental celebration in which, through God’s mercy and forgiveness, the sinner is reconciled with God and also with the Church, Christ’s Body, which is wounded by sin (CCC 1422, 1442–1445, 1468).  Copyright © 2000, USCCB.

Glossary - PENANCE, SACRAMENT OF: The liturgical celebration of God’s forgiveness of the sins of the penitent, who is thus reconciled with God and with the Church. The acts of the penitent—contrition, the confession of sins, and satisfaction or reparation—together with the prayer of absolution by the priest, constitute the essential elements of the Sacrament of Penance (CCC 980, 1422, 1440, 1448).  Copyright © 2000, USCCB.

 

Anointing of the Sick

The Catholic sacrament of Anointing of the Sick, formerly known as Last Rites or Extreme Unction, is a ritual of healing appropriate not only for physical but also for mental and spiritual sickness.

Glossary - ANOINTING OF THE SICK: One of the seven sacraments, also known as the “sacrament of the dying,” administered by a priest to a baptized person who begins to be in danger of death because of illness or old age, through prayer and the anointing of the body with the oil of the sick. The proper effects of the sacrament include a special grace of healing and comfort to the Christian who is suffering the infirmities of serious illness or old age, and the forgiving of the person’s sins (CCC 1499, 1520, 1523, 1526–1532).  Copyright © 2000, USCCB.

 

 

Sacraments at the Service of Communion

Marriage / Matrimony

For Catholics, the Sacrament of Marriage, or Holy Matrimony, is a public sign that one gives oneself totally to this other person. It is also a public statement about God: the loving union of husband and wife speaks of family values and also God's values.

Glossary - Marriage: A covenant or partnership of life between a man and woman, which is ordered to the well–being of the spouses and to the procreation and upbringing of children. When validly contracted between two baptized people, marriage is a sacrament (Matrimony) (CCC 1601). Copyright © 2000, USCCB.


Holy Orders

In the Sacrament of Holy Orders, or Ordination, the priest being ordained vows to lead other Catholics by bringing them the sacraments (especially the Eucharist), by proclaiming the Gospel, and by providing other means to holiness.

Glossary - Holy Orders:The Sacrament of Apostolic Ministry by which the mission entrusted by Christ to his Apostles continues to be exercised in the Church through the laying on of hands. This sacrament has three distinct degrees or “orders”: deacon, priest, and bishop. All three confer a permanent, sacramental character (CCC 1536).  Copyright © 2000, USCCB.

Glossary - Ordination:The rite of the Sacrament of Holy Orders by which the bishop, through the imposition of hands and the prayer of consecration, confers the order of bishop, priest, or deacon to exercise a sacred power which comes from Christ on behalf of the Church (CCC 1538).  Copyright © 2000, USCCB.

 

For more information please contact the Parish Office in our contact section.

 

The Pastor's Corner

 

Love Your Enemies 

Love your enemies.—Matthew 5:38-48 

Can you picture getting to heaven, and the first person you meet is the one you liked least on earth? It’s possible. 

After all, God loves that person just as much as he loves you. 

 

 

Read more...

About Our Church

Welcome to the website of St. Dorothy Catholic Church in Glendora, CA.

On this site there is information about our church and location, our schools and care facility. You will also find our history, and the most important aspect of our life together, the celebration of the sacraments.

We are an active Christian faith community. We are a parish within the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles. Over the years, the parish has been served by religious orders as well as by diocesan priests.

We are equally blessed by a tremendous diversity among our parishioners. We have a large age range from babies and school children to the retired and elderly. As well, ethnic communities bring a richness to our parish. We believe that no matter what our age, culture or ethnicity we are brothers and sisters and together form the Body of Christ, the church in this place and time.

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